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Journal of Aquatic Plant Management – Volume 53, 2015

Below are the article titles for JAPM for 2015.

Note that only the abstracts for the articles are available online, except for open access articles which have the full pdf available.

January
Integrating hot water under a benthic barrier for curlyleaf pondweed turion control
Thomas C. Barr, III and Joseph M. DiTomaso
1
Response of water hyacinth and nontarget emergent plants to foliar applications of bispyribac-sodium alone and combination treatments
Christopher Mudge and Michael Netherland
7
Response of Old World climbing fern and native vegetation to repeated ground herbicide treatments
Jeffrey T. Hutchinson and Kenneth A. Langeland
14
Chemical eradication methods for aquarium strains of Chaetomorpha
Rachel L. Odom and Linda J. Walters
22
Effect of selected herbicides on growth and lipid content of Nannochloris oculata
Lipin Deng, Scott A. Senseman, Terry J. Gentry, David A. Zuberer, Edinalvo R. Camargo, Taylor L. Weiss, and Timothy P. Devarenne
28
open access
Effects of N and P additions to water column on growth of Vallisneria natans
Xueying Mei and Xiufeng Zhang
36
Effect of water lettuce and filamentous algae on phosphorus loads in farm canals in the Everglades Agricultural Area
Jehangir H. Bhadha, Timothy A. Lang, Susanna M. Gomez, Samira H. Daroub, and Mihai C. Giurcanu
44
Ecology and phenology of flowering rush in the Detroit Lakes chain of lakes, Minnesota
Michelle Marko, John Madsen, R.A. Smith, B. Sartain, and CL Olson
54
Model parameterization for the growth of three submerged aquatic macrophytes
Irineu Bianchini Jr., Marcela B. Cunha-Santino, Jurity A. M. Milan, Carlos J. Rodrigues, and Joao H. P. Dias
64
Grass carp do not consume the nuisance benthic cyanobacterium, Lyngbya wollei
Jo-Marie E. Kasinak, Crystal J. Bisop, Russell A. Wright, and Alan E. Wilson
74
Growth and developmental performance of the milfoil weevil on distinct lineages of Eurasian watermilfoil and a northern x Eurasian hybrid
Kyle Borrowman, Eric PS Sager, and Ryan Thum
81
Performance of the alligatorweed flea beetle, Agasicles hygrophila, on nontarget plant species
Junjiao Lu, Longlong Zhao, Na Li, Dong Jia, Yanqiong Guo, Jianing Wei, Renjun Fan, and Ruiyan Ma
88
open access
Using the West-Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) as a mechanism for invasive aquatic plant management in Florida
Aarin Conrad Allen and Edward O. Keith
95
Temperature and herbicide impacts on germination of water chestnut seeds
Patricia R. Rector, Peter J. Nitzsche, and Salvatore S. Mangiafico
105
Impact of walking catfish (Clarias batrachus) on growth of water chestnut (Trapa bispinosa) and waterhyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) in waterlogged ecosystem
Somnath Roy Chowdhury, Rajeeb K. Mohanty, P. S. Brahmanand, and Ashwani Kumar
113
Combining hydroacoustic and point-intercept survey methods to assess aquatic plant species abundance patterns and community dominance
Ray D. Valley, Matthew B. Johnson, Donna L. Dustin, K. Dean Jones, Michael R. Lauenstein, Justin Nawrocki
121
NOTES
Endothall (dimethylalkylamine) concentration exposure time evaluation against two populations of Elodea canadensis
Christopher Mudge, Kurt Getsinger and Cody Gray
130
Evaluation of six herbicides for the control of water primrose (Ludwigia pep/aides (Kunth) P.H. Raven spp. glabrescens)
Bradley T. Sartain, R. M. Wersal, J. D. Madsen and J.C. Cheshier
134
Comparative efficacy of chelated copper formulations alone and in combination with
diquat against hydrilla and subsequent sensitivity of American lotus
138
Angling effort on an embayment of Lake Guntersville, Alabama, before and after herbicide application.
Michael Maceina, T. R. Hanson, JJ Buckingham, and SM Sammons
141
Concentration–exposure time relationships for controlling fanwort (Cabomba caroliniana) with endothall amine salt and carfentrazone 144
July
A comparison of two hydroacoustic methods for estimating submerged macrophyte distribution and abundance: A cautionary note
PAUL RADOMSKI AND BETH V. HOLBROOK*
150
Endothall concentration exposure time evaluation against horned pondweed in a hydrodynamic system
CRAIG GYSELINCK AND LAUREN A. COURTER
159
Control of delta arrowhead (Sagittaria platyphylla) in Australian irrigation channels with long exposure to endothall dipotassium salt during winter
DANIEL CLEMENTS, TONY M. DUGDALE, KYM L. BUTLER, AND TREVOR D. HUNT*
164
Efficacy of single and consecutive early-season diquat treatments on curlyleaf pondweed and associated aquatic macrophytes: A case study
GREGORY J. BUGBEE, JORDAN A. GIBBONS, AND MARK JUNE-WELLS*
170
Laboratory and greenhouse response of monoecious hydrilla to fluridone
MICHAEL D. NETHERLAND*
178
Imazamox control of invasive Japanese eelgrass (Zostera japonica): Efficacy and nontarget impacts
Kim D. Patten
185
Effects of a nonnative species of Poaceae on aquatic macrophyte community composition: A comparison with a native species
SARA REGINA DE AMORIM, CRISTIANE AKEMI UMETSU, DOUGLAS TOLEDO, AND ANTONIO FERNANDO MONTEIRO CAMARGO*
191
Endothall, triclopyr and fluridone granular release profiles under static and aerated water conditions
BRETT WELLS BULTEMEIER AND WILLIAM T. HALLER*
197
Effects of silt-laden water on the growth of submerged plants
QIAN-JIN CAO AND LING WANG*
202
Impact of refrigeration on eggs of the hydrilla tip mining midge Cricotopus lebetis (Diptera: Chironomidae): Larval hatch rate and subsequent development
JULIE BANISZEWSKI, EMMA N. I. WEEKS, AND JAMES P. CUDA
209
NOTES
Influence of ramet coverage on sprouting of crested floating-heart ramets and response of quiescent ramets to contact herbicides
LEIF N. WILLEY AND MICHAEL D. NETHERLAND*
216
Effect of water depth and substrate composition on growth of the aquatic weed rotala (Rotala rotundifolia)
LYN A. GETTYS, WARNER OROZCO OBANDO, AND FRANCIS CLIFFORD REED III*
220
Evaluation of six herbicides for control of swamp smartweed [Persicaria hydropiperoides (Michx.) Small] under flooded and moist soil conditions.
JOHN D MADSEN, R M WERSAL, and W ROBLES
224
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Journal of Aquatic Plant Management – Volume 51, 2013

Below are the article titles for JAPM for 2013.

January
Do patterns of establishment support invasive status of five aquatic plants in New Zealand? Karsten Dollerup, Tenna Riis, and John S. Clayton 1
Predicting Eurasian Watermilfoil’s (Myriophyllum spicatum) distribution and its likely response to biological control in a spring-fed river, D. F. Spencer, and R. I. Carruthers 7
Identification of Eurasian watermilfoil using hydroacoustics, Jeremy L. Farrell, James P. Harrison, Lawrence W. Eichler, James W. Sutherland, Sandra A. Nierzwicki-Bauer, and Charles W. Boylen 15
Survival of parrotfeather following simulated drawdown events, Ryan M. Wersal, J. D. Madsen, and P. D. Gerard 22
High-density grass carp stocking effects on a reservoir invasive plant and water quality, A. Brad Garner, Thomas J. Kwak, Kenneth L. Manuel, and D. Hugh Barwick 27
Release and evaluation of Cyrtobagous salviniaeon common salvinia in southern Louisiana, Philip W. Tipping, M. R. Martin, W. J. Hulslander Jr, P. T. Madeira, R. M. Pierce, M. D. Smart, and T. D. Center 34
Impact of aquatic herbicide combinations on non-target submersed plants, Christopher Mudge 39
Use of a small-scale primary screening method to predict effects of flumioxazin and carfentrazone-ethyl on native and invasive submersed plants, LeeAnn M. Glomski and Michael D. Netherland 45
NOTES
Efficacy of 2,4-D ester on variable-leaf milfoil control for partial lake treatments in New Hampshire waterbodies, Erika J. Haug and M. D. Bellaud 49
Control of submersed flowering rush with contact and systemic aquatic herbicides under experimental conditions, Angela G. Poovey, C. R. Mudge, K. D. Getsinger, and H. Sedivy 53
Effect of subsurface and foliar applications of bispyribac-sodium on water hyacinth, water lettuce, and giant salvinia, LeeAnn M. Glomski and Christopher R. Mudge 62
Manuscript Preparation Guide 66
July
Comparison of use rates and treatment timing with glyphyosate to control Mexican water lily, D. E. Hofstra, P. D. Champion, T. M. Dugdale, M. Fridman, R. Baker, and M. Finlay 69
Interactions of herbicides, surfactants, and the giant salvinia weevil (Cyrtobagous salviniae) for control of giant salvinia (Salvinia molesta), Christopher R. Mudge, Nathan E. Harms, and Julie G. Nachtrieb 77
Efficacy of experimental and recently registered herbicides on hygrophila, William T. Haller and Lyn A. Gettys Overwintering habitat requirements of the milfoil weevil, Euhrychiopsis lecontei, in two central Wisconsin lakes, Amy L. Thorstenson, Ronald L. Crunkilton, Michael A. Bozek, and Nancy B. Turyk 84
Overwintering habitat requirements of the milfoil weevil, Euhrychiopsis lecontei, in two central Wisconsin lakes, Amy L. Thorstenson, Ronald L. Crunkilton, Michael A. Bozek, and Nancy B. Turyk
88
Molecular techniques to distinguish morphologically similar Hydrilla verticillata, Egeria densa, Elodea nuttallii, and Elodea canadensis, Nancy B. Rybicki, Julie D. Kirshtein, and Mary A. Voytek 94
The growth and accumulation of osmotic solutes of the halophyte common glasswort (Salicornia europaea) under salinity conditions, Kee Woong Park, Jae Young An, Hee Jae Lee, Daeyoung Son, Young Geol Sohn, Chang-Gi Kim, and Jeung Joo Lee 103
Joint use of insects and fungal pathogens in the management of waterhyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes): Perspectives for Ethiopia, Y. Firehun, P. C. Struik, E. A. Lantinga, and T. Tay 109
Mass-rearing Cyrtobagous salviniaefor biological control of giant salvinia: Field release implications, Julie G. Nachtrieb 122
Effect of ecotype, sediment composition, and fertility level on productivity of eight Florida ecotypes of American eelgrass (Vallisneria americana), Lyn A. Gettys and William T. Haller 127
Control of smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) seedlings with four herbicides, Carrie A. Knott, E. P. Webster, and P. Nabukalu 132
Manuscript Preparation Guide 136
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Invasive waterweed has Alaska ecologists, homeowners and aviators concerned

Elodea, a slender plant with whorled leaves, has been identified in four main areas in Alaska: Eyak Lake in the Cordova area, where the plant was first documented in 1982; and, since 2009, Chena Slough, Chena Lake and parts of the Chena River in Fairbanks, several lakes in the Kenai Peninsula, and lakes in Anchorage, including Sand Lake. Ecologists warn that the plant, known for its dense growth and high cold tolerance, threatens boating, float plane and commercial and sport fishing enterprises and could eventually affect fish species in water bodies across Alaska. READ MORE
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Weed treatment proposed for outstanding lake

Lake Kohangatera is to receive treatment to eliminate two new invasive weed species following surveys by NIWA after the aggressive exotic weeds Elodea canadensis and Egeria densa (Oxygen weed) were found in the uppermost reaches of Gollans Swamp. READ MORE
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With a noxious aquatic weed threatening Alaska’s prime fishing waters, science and local politics are at odds

Source: Alaska Dispatch (Alaska) 11/28/2013
Two species of Elodea, aquatic plants commonly known as Canadian and Nuttall’s waterweed, have been found in recent years in a handful of lakes and sloughs near Fairbanks, Anchorage, Cordova, and Kenai. READ MORE
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Sammamish River Trail: Use Caution as Weed Removal Work Begins

Divers are removing the invasive aquatic weed Brazilian elodea from the river. READ MORE
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Aquatic invader spoils Sand Lake

ANCHORAGE – Fisherman, rowers, and pilots all use Sand Lake for fun and recreation, but the lake is being threatened—along with 15 other waterways throughout Alaska—by an invasive aquatic species known as elodea. READ MORE
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Thurston County Noxious Weed Agency Coordinator Honored Nationally

An upriver soldier in the state’s battle against invasive species has been recognized nationally for keeping an aquarium plant from taking over the Chehalis River system.
Rick Johnson, Coordinator of the Thurston County Noxious Weed Agency in Washington State, is recognized by the US Department of the Interior for his 34-year record of commitment to invasive plant management, and has served on multiple weed management committees, boards and associations. Rick led a program for the management of Brazilian Elodea in the Chehalis River system, an initiative which spanned multiple agencies over the course of ten years.

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Hydrilla Hunt! Join the Search for a Superweed

hydrillahunt-logolowresb

Join the Search for a Superweed

Hydrilla Hunt! program solicits help of lake and river enthusiasts
to discover invasive aquatic plant

GLENCOE, Ill. (June 12, 2013) – Boaters, anglers, swimmers, and others who enjoy Illinois’ lakes and rivers are keeping their eyes peeled this summer for an aquatic “superweed.” Through the Hydrilla Hunt! program, citizen volunteers are on the lookout for a highly invasive aquatic plant named Hydrilla verticillata, or simply “hydrilla.”

Recognized as one of the world’s worst weeds, hydrilla can grow an inch per day and form dense mats of vegetation at the water surface. Within the past few years, hydrilla has been discovered in Wisconsin and Indiana and it is expected to arrive in Illinois very soon. Our desirable native aquatic plants, sport fishing, native wildlife, waterfront property values, and recreational uses might all be seriously impacted.

“Early detection of hydrilla could save Illinois millions of dollars in control costs,” noted Cathy McGlynn, coordinator for the Northeast Illinois Invasive Plant Partnership (NIIPP). “Experience from other states shows that once a waterway becomes infested with hydrilla, it’s nearly impossible to control. Our hope in Illinois is to identify the plant at a very early stage when populations are still small enough to eradicate and manage,” added McGlynn.

The strain of hydrilla that has been found in the northern United States is believed to have originated in Korea. It grows on mucky as well as sandy bottoms of lakes and rivers, and from very shallow water to depths of 20 feet or more. It can be spotted snagged on fishing lines or on boat anchors, or by noting plants seen while boating or growing along the sides of a pier. Hydrilla spreads quickly, since just a small stem fragment of hydrilla can sprout roots and grow into a whole new plant.

Anyone can participate in the Hydrilla Hunt! program. Volunteers are encouraged to take a more detailed look at aquatic plants they encounter while out and about on Illinois’ waterways. A Hydrilla Identification Sheet (available for download at the program’s website, see below) can be used to differentiate hydrilla from look-alike plants such as Brazilian elodea and American elodea. Volunteers who suspect they may have found hydrilla are asked to take several digital photographs and email them to the Hydrilla Hunt! program for verification.

For more information, including how to become a Hydrilla Hunt! volunteer, a Hydrilla Identification Sheet, fact sheets, and other resources, visit www.niipp.net/hydrilla. The Hydrilla Hunt! program is coordinated by the Northeast Illinois Invasive Plant Partnership, the Chicago Botanic Garden, and the Lake County Health Department-Lakes Management Unit. Funding support has been provided by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources through the Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant.

Download the press release

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Aquatic invasion: Asexual weed reproducing like crazy in Kenai Peninsula lakes

Elodea_canadensisSource: Redoubt Reporter (Alaska) 02/17/2013
A newly discovered invader – the first submerged aquatic – has set off alarms. It can cause so much damage so quickly that a small army of biologists are soliciting help to combat its spread. More startling than its presence was how well it was doing under the thick ice. “When we augered the hole and water splashed out, the elodea splashed out with it, vibrant and green.” READ MORE
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